An Essay On Criticism Essayist

An Essay On Criticism Essayist-59
The only living Englishman who ever looks into these volumes is, of course, a gentleman of Polish extraction.

The only living Englishman who ever looks into these volumes is, of course, a gentleman of Polish extraction.

He is a learned man, but it is not knowledge of Leonardo that remains with us, but a vision, such as we get in a good novel where everything contributes to bring the writer's conception as a whole before us.

Only here, in the essay, where the bounds are so strict and facts have to be used in their nakedness, the true writer like Walter Pater makes these limitations yield their own quality.

What is there to interest another in the fact that one has enjoyed a walking tour, or has amused oneself by rambling down Cheapside and looking at the turtles in Mr. Stevenson and Samuel Butler chose very different methods of exciting our interest in these domestic themes.

Stevenson, of course, trimmed and polished and set out his matter in the traditional eighteenth-century form.

In her brief preface to the collection, Woolf distinguished the "common reader" (a phrase borrowed from Samuel Johnson) from "the critic and scholar": "He is worse educated, and nature has not gifted him so generously.

He reads for his own pleasure rather than to impart knowledge or correct the opinions of others. ideas and opinions" about the nature of the English essay.

It is admirably done, but we cannot help feeling anxious, as the essay proceeds, lest the material may give out under the craftsman's fingers.

The ingot is so small, the manipulation so incessant.

But that value, which is contributed by the reader, perhaps illicitly, in his desire to get as much into the book from all possible sources as he can, must be ruled out here.

There is no room for the impurities of literature in an essay.

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