Creative Writing Descriptions

Creative Writing Descriptions-42
This course is designed to guide students in creative writing through experience in three genres: short story, poetry, and creative non-fiction.The course includes analysis of literary models (professional writings in each genre), individual and class criticism of work in a workshop mode, and lecture on and discussion of literary techniques in each genre.When it comes to word choice, the diction of the word is just as important to consider as the meaning.

This course is designed to guide students in creative writing through experience in three genres: short story, poetry, and creative non-fiction.The course includes analysis of literary models (professional writings in each genre), individual and class criticism of work in a workshop mode, and lecture on and discussion of literary techniques in each genre.When it comes to word choice, the diction of the word is just as important to consider as the meaning.

Whether you write fiction or nonfiction, for children or adults, history textbooks or science fiction space operas, you know there’s a difference between correct writing and good writing.

Correct writing has all the commas and prepositions in the right places; good writing has internal logic, pattern and coherence. Writing that soars off the page and straight into your imagination.

• By proximity—details that are grouped together: the appearance of a character, the items on top of a dresser, flowers in a garden • By quality—separating the sweet from the sour, the melodious from the discordant • Chronologically—listing actions as they occur • Spatially—moving in a pattern through the space being described.

Some patterns lend themselves to certain kinds of description: Spatial descriptions are obvious choices for establishing setting; chronological descriptions can be woven through action as it unfolds. Try employing unexpected methods of description to different types of material.

Speaking the words you’ve written is a great way to bring all the hidden effects of your word choices to the surface.

Note the difference in mood in the following passages, both of which essentially describe the same scene: During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher.Choose a descriptive passage from a recent piece of writing and read the work aloud.Does the rhythm of the words evoke the mood and emotional response that you’d intended?The length, complexity and sound of a word all contribute to its connotation.The dictionary defines connotation as “the suggestion of a meaning by a word apart from the thing it explicitly names or describes.” It’s because of these subtle shades of meaning that word choice is such an important element of creative writing.But strong writing requires more than simply switching from passive to active word choices.It requires concrete details, specific nouns and verbs (which in turn means reducing the number of adjectives and adverbs) and precise, uncluttered prose.No matter which “eye” you employ, once you’ve collected details and images, you’ll need to be able to transform them into phrases, sentences and paragraphs your reader will understand and appreciate.There are, of course, many ways to relay descriptive information to a reader: • By type or sensory perception—the smells, colors, textures, etc.What happens when you reveal a character’s personality chronologically?You’ve no doubt been warned about the weakness of the passive voice.

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