Geoffrey Sayre-Mccord Essays On Moral Realism

Geoffrey Sayre-Mccord Essays On Moral Realism-24
Now consider two worlds, one of which has an objective morality, whatever that might mean (God’s will? The existence of the objective ethics is in no way necessary for a derivation of our belief in an objective ethics from an evolutionary perspective. (6) Therefore, there is no reason to believe in an objective morality. It does not follow from the fact that your belief that P varies regardless of whether or not P is true either that P is not true or that there is no fact about whether P is true.[4] (the order of being). As Lillehammer rightly points out,[5] in order to evaluate Ruse’s argument, we have to understand what Ruse means by “objective” and “objectivity.” Before we consider what Ruse has written, let’s first distinguish between just in case some moral claims are true in virtue of corresponding to actually existing objects or properties that function as truthmakers for the claims in question.

Now consider two worlds, one of which has an objective morality, whatever that might mean (God’s will? The existence of the objective ethics is in no way necessary for a derivation of our belief in an objective ethics from an evolutionary perspective. (6) Therefore, there is no reason to believe in an objective morality. It does not follow from the fact that your belief that P varies regardless of whether or not P is true either that P is not true or that there is no fact about whether P is true.[4] (the order of being). As Lillehammer rightly points out,[5] in order to evaluate Ruse’s argument, we have to understand what Ruse means by “objective” and “objectivity.” Before we consider what Ruse has written, let’s first distinguish between just in case some moral claims are true in virtue of corresponding to actually existing objects or properties that function as truthmakers for the claims in question.So, at the very least, what we can say is that an objective ethics is redundant to the evolutionist’s case.[3]The objectivist must agree that his / her ultimate principles are . For example, someone who holds that morality is ontologically objective might maintain that the sentence “murder is wrong” is true because there is a real property, wrongness, and all moral acts that result in murder have that property.Moreover, all murders would have this property even if no one contemplated the moral status of murder and even if everyone thought that murder did not have such a property.

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These things hold inevitably and necessarily, whether or not there is a God.[9] Why does Ruse not consider the possibility that at least some objective moral truths are analytic? Ruse can conclude that “the only reason we could have for believing in an ontologically objective morality is the actual existence of an ontologically objective morality” only by that there is no ontologically objective morality.

Thus, the thesis that there are no analytic truths about morality is both an assumption and an implication of the conclusion of his supporting argument.

While some subscribe to a divine command theory, others (no doubt impressed by arguments which go back to Plato’s The statement, “independent, objective, moral code — a code which, ultimately, is unchanging and not dependent on the contingencies of human nature,” suggests that Ruse has ontological objectivity in mind when he refers to objectivity.

So we can reformulate his supporting argument as follows.

" Metaethics seeks to understand the nature of ethical properties and evaluations as such, and not just the content of particular norms or evaluations.

In addition to those given above, examples of metaethical questions include: A meta-ethical theory, unlike a normative ethical theory, does not contain any ethical evaluations.

While Ruse at least defends (4′), he says nothing about (5′), perhaps because he thinks its truth is obvious. Many philosophers, including Richard Swinburne, have argued that moral truths are For the existence of the phenomena described by analytic truths needs no explanation.

It does not need explaining that all bachelors are unmarried, or that if you add two to two you get four.

Fortunately for us, however, such passages are not hard to find. Clearly, here, the evolutionist and the Christian part company.

Admittedly, there is no unanimity among Christians as to the true foundations of morality.

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