Problem Solving Activities Teens

Problem Solving Activities Teens-63
The group has a limited amount of food and water and must create shelter from items around the island.Encourage working together as a group and hearing out every child that has an idea about how to make it through the three days as safely and comfortably as possible.Classroom problem solving activities need not be dull and routine.

The group has a limited amount of food and water and must create shelter from items around the island.Encourage working together as a group and hearing out every child that has an idea about how to make it through the three days as safely and comfortably as possible.Classroom problem solving activities need not be dull and routine.

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So teens need help learning how to clearly and specifically identify problems.

“OK, but tell me exactly what the problem is.” “I DON’T KNOW! Let’s try to narrow it down then.” On the other hand, not all problems have been clearly identified.

Place them all in a bag (five-10 clues should be sufficient.) Then have a student reach into the bag and one by one pull out clues.

Choose a minimum number of clues they must draw out before making their first guess (two- three).

Problem-solving skills are necessary in all areas of life, and classroom problem solving activities can be a great way to get students prepped and ready to solve real problems in real life scenarios.

Whether in school, work or in their social relationships, the ability to critically analyze a problem, map out all its elements and then prepare a workable solution is one of the most valuable skills one can acquire in life.Here are five classroom problem solving activities your students are sure to benefit from as well as enjoy doing: Having your students create lists related to whatever you are currently studying can be a great way to help them to enrich their understanding of a topic while learning to problem-solve.For example, if you are studying a historical, current or fictional event that did not turn out favorably, have your students brainstorm ways that the protagonist or participants could have created a different, more positive outcome.Guessing is one useful way of coming up with solutions.On the other hand, just hollering out whatever comes to your mind as a solution brings little benefit (and it’s annoying). Sometimes, that is what creates the problem (i.e., limits to resources or options or time).There is real value in being able to recognize potential problems.Have your kid pause and consider: “Are there any ways you can think this might go badly.” “Do you have any ideas about how we might do this better somehow? ” “Why didn’t this happen the way it was supposed to? ” (These are not the same as Why can’t I” questions.Then have the class as a group figure out the ideal way the student can address the issue and hopefully solve it.This fun detective game encourages problem-solving, critical thinking and cognitive development.Label the box “The Problem-Solving Box.” Invite students to anonymously write down and submit any problem or issue they might be having at school or at home, ones that they can’t seem to figure out on their own.Once or twice a week, have a student draw one of the items from the box and read it aloud.

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