Santiago Calatrava Dissertation

Santiago Calatrava Dissertation-42
How can architects be the socially relevant force contributing viable concepts? ronienne mise au jour sur le site de la Vigna Barberini: la cenatio rotunda de la Domus Aurea?

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Therefore understanding the cognitive barriers of design tools iii and negotiating the social expectations are essential when advancing new technologies for architecture. iv Preface Parts of this dissertation have appeared in previously published work, as summarized below. Parts of Chapter 4 are based on the material accepted for publication in: Wierzbicki, M. 51 Figure 3.8 Left: Door socket, Archaic Temple at Hierakonpolis, Egypt, 3000-2675 BC; Right: Door socket, Ur temple, Mesopotamia, 2150-2050 BC .................... ric, foldable side panels ............................................................... 71 Figure 3.21 Tycho Brahe, Stjerneborg, circa 1581 ..........................................................

53 Figure 3.9 Rolling door, Derinkuyu, circa 8th century BC ............................................ 74 Figure 3.22 Left: The remains of Stjerneborg in 1901; Right: Reconstructed Stjerneborg in 1958 ...................................................

55 Figure 3.10 Santiago Calatrava, folding doors at the Ernsting Warehouse, 1985 ........... ric, doorways ............................................................................... 75 Figure 3.23 Left: Observatory, Department of Advanced Geodesy, Czech Technical University, Prague; Right: Observatory, Physikalischer Verein, Frankfurt .................................

55 Figure 3.11 Santiago Calatrava, entrance to the conference room at the Abbey of Sankt Gallen ............................................................................................. 77 xi Figure 3.24 The European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), Cerro Armazones, Chile .............................................................................................................

This study focuses on rigidly foldable kinetic structures as they exemplify the potential advantages and challenges of novel architecture; and they are a logical expansion of the traditional adjustable architectural elements. 32 Figure 3.1 Terra Amata site ...........................................................................................

For decades, theorists expected kinetic architecture to address the shortcomings of the traditional buildings. 43 Figure 3.2 Left: The Terra Amata hut, a conjectural reconstruction as proposed by de Lumley; Right: Uncovered shade kishoni of Tusayan ....................... bekli Tepe site ......................................................................................... 45 Figure 3.4 Studio of Canaletto, Venice: San Pietro in Castello, 1734-1742 (detail) ..... The construction industry is the largest source of waste and remains inefficient, while the architectural profession is being challenged by digital technologies, conflicting paradigms, and adverse market realities. In Proceedings of the 23rd Canadian Congress of Applied Mechanics CANCAM 2011, Vancouver, BC, 900-903. 115 5.4.3 Testing an Intuitionistic Model ...................................................... 25 Figure 2.7 Arthur Ganson, Machine with 11 Scraps of Paper, the MIT Museum, Cambridge, MA ............................................................................................ What then are the obstacles in improving buildings? Or, is it the social reluctance to accept novel ideas? 119 5.4.4 Results ............................................................................................ 123 5.4.5 Integration with Design Workflows ............................................... 26 Figure 2.8 Arthur Ganson, Machine with Concrete, the MIT Museum, Cambridge, MA ............................................................................................ 56 Figure 3.12 Macellum Magnum on the reverse of Nero? 60 Figure 3.13 Santiago Calatrava, Quadracci Pavilion, Milwaukee Art Museum, 2001 ... ric, interior ................................................................................... 78 Figure 3.25 Salle Valentino aquatic circus, Paris, 1886 .................................................. 64 Figure 3.14 Santiago Calatrava, the skylight over the cantonal emergency call center, Sankt Gallen ............................................................................... 79 Figure 3.26 Jean Nouvel, Institut du monde arabe, Paris, 1987 ...................................... This study focuses on rigidly foldable kinetic structures as they exemplify the potential advantages and challenges of novel architecture; and they are a logical expansion of the traditional adjustable architectural elements. 71 3.8 Architecture of Spectacle ....................................................................... 86 4.3 Advantages ............................................................................................. 88 4.4 Challenges .............................................................................................. 91 4.4.1 Social Acceptance ............................................................................ 91 4.4.2 Ethics of the Inscrutable ................................................................... For decades, theorists expected kinetic architecture to address the shortcomings of the traditional buildings. Solar Fringe ................................................... 62 3.6 Architecture of Weather ......................................................................... 62 3.6.1 Architecture of Shadow .................................................................... 92 4.4.3 Design Methods and Tools ............................................................... Madalina Nicoleta Wierzbicki, 2014 ii Abstract Built environments are the most prominent and important part of our material culture. 111 5.4.1 Traditional Methods for Developing Design Requirements .......... Although they are vital for accommodating the exponentially growing and increasingly urbanized population under the challenging conditions of severe climatic changes and destabilized global societies, researchers note that the methods of both their design and construction need to be significantly improved. Evaluation of the Intuitionistic Approach for Modeling Architectural Design Requirements. 112 5.4.2 An Intuitionistic Approach Toward Information Modeling ........... In response, the present thesis investigates the evolving, influenced by digital technologies, paradigms of public spaces, and human reasoning-driven design tools, while incorporating such human-centric considerations as social dynamics, history, and culture into the engineering and architectural design methods for built environments. In Proceedings of the Northeast Regional Conference 2006: Imag(in)ing Worlds to Come. 50 Figure 3.7 Left: The Robenhausen door, circa 4000 BC; Center: The Z? It is concluded that architecture, its design and construction are primarily a social endeavor. Laval, Quebec: Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. Parts of Chapter 5 are based on the material published in: Wierzbicki, M. rich door, 3063 BC; Right: The Khonsuhotep door, circa 1285 BC .............................................

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