Thanksgiving Essay Spanish

Thanksgiving Essay Spanish-30
Before I leave you to it, I thought I’d include the complete essay written in 2002 by Dr. What exactly the Seloy natives thought of those strange liturgical proceedings we do not know, except that, in his personal chronicle, Father Lopez wrote that “the Indians imitated all they saw done.” What was the meal that followed? But, from our knowledge of what the Spaniards had on board their five ships, we can surmise that it was cocido, a stew made from salted pork and garbanzo beans, laced with garlic seasoning, and accompanied by hard sea biscuits and red wine.If it happened that the Seloy contributed to the meal from their own food stores, fresh or smoked, then the menu could have included as well: turkey, venison, and gopher tortoise; seafood such as mullet, drum, and sea catfish; maize (corn), beans and squash.

Before I leave you to it, I thought I’d include the complete essay written in 2002 by Dr. What exactly the Seloy natives thought of those strange liturgical proceedings we do not know, except that, in his personal chronicle, Father Lopez wrote that “the Indians imitated all they saw done.” What was the meal that followed? But, from our knowledge of what the Spaniards had on board their five ships, we can surmise that it was cocido, a stew made from salted pork and garbanzo beans, laced with garlic seasoning, and accompanied by hard sea biscuits and red wine.If it happened that the Seloy contributed to the meal from their own food stores, fresh or smoked, then the menu could have included as well: turkey, venison, and gopher tortoise; seafood such as mullet, drum, and sea catfish; maize (corn), beans and squash.

Gannon the highest academic honor of that nation, Knight Commander of the Order of Isabel la Católica.

It was another bewildering holiday in America for all us, a newly citizened family in the mid 1960′s. “See, abuela,” we told her rushedly in Spanish, “see? and corn and everything else we have to make here today. It’s what they do in America.” “Si, Si…” my grandmother did her best to pretend she understood. We stared, and then we slowly, one by one, became dismayed. The pictures we were all looking at were so far from what we looked like. We put our arms around her, smelled her delicious smell of arroz/ rice, with cuminos and aji and cilantro that always hung so comfortingly around her.

When his story appeared in Boston and other papers, New England went into shock.

WBZ-TV in Boston interviewed me live by satellite for its p.m. The newsman told me that all of Massachusetts was “freaked out,” and that, as he spoke, “the Selectmen of Plymouth are holding an emergency meeting to contend with this new information that there were Spaniards in Florida before there were Englishmen in Massachusetts.” I replied, “Fine.

Johns River with Jean Ribault in 1562 and René de Laudonnière in 1564 similarly offered prayers of thanksgiving for their safe arrivals.

But all of those ventures, Catholic and Calvinist, failed to put down permanent roots. Augustine’s ceremonies were important historically in that they took place in what would develop into a permanently occupied European city, North America’s first.

And you can tell them for me that, by the time the Pilgrims came to Plymouth, St.

Augustine was up for urban renewal.” The somewhat rattled chairman of the Selectmen was quoted as saying: “I hate to take the wind out of the professor’s sails, but there were no turkeys running around in Florida in the 1500s.

During the 18th and 19th centuries British forces won out over those of Spain and France for mastery over the continent.

Thus, British observances, such as the annual reenactment of the Pilgrims’ harvest festival in 1621, became a national practice and holiday in the new United States, and over time obliterated knowledge of the prior Spanish experiences in Florida, particularly at St. Indeed, as the Pilgrims’ legend grew, people of Anglo-American descent in New England came to believe that Plymouth was the first European settlement in the country and that no other Europeans were here before the arrival of the Mayflower – beliefs that are still widespread in that region.

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