There Should Be No Homework

There Should Be No Homework-72
They then end up being rewarded for cheating which doesn't benefit them at all.And finally, a lot of teachers don't often have the time to grade papers properly as they are too busy with designing lesson plans and consulting teaching resources in order to just manage lessons.The first reason that children should not be given homework is that they need time to relax and take their minds off work.

They then end up being rewarded for cheating which doesn't benefit them at all.And finally, a lot of teachers don't often have the time to grade papers properly as they are too busy with designing lesson plans and consulting teaching resources in order to just manage lessons.The first reason that children should not be given homework is that they need time to relax and take their minds off work.

Secondly, it reduces the amount of time that children could be spending with their families.

Family time is especially important to a growing child and without it social problems can crop up and a family unit can be compromised by a lack of time being spent together.

The benefits of homework has been debated by teachers and parents for years as the very word evokes very negative connotations to every involved, students, parents and teachers.

Although many people think of homework as doing more harm than good by causing copious amounts of unnecessary stress to everyone, others believe that it has great advantages for children by encouraging them to think more independently outside the classroom.

"Homework in the traditional sense (worksheets, structured assignments...) may not be appropriate for all kids, but continuing the learning experience is what's important," he says.

"While traditional assignments might not contribute to academic performance, simple activities at home can help students retain concepts and apply them to real world situations." Homework gives parents a glimpse of what their kids are being taught in the classroom--and armed with that knowledge, says Ridner, parents should become advocates for their child's learning.Thirdly, homework can cause conflict between children and parents when the parent wants to the child to do their homework but meets resistance from the student to do an overwhelming task.Too much homework can encourage cheating because children end up copying off one another in an attempt to finish all their assignments.Thirdly, doing homework will prepare students for the big end tests.If a child does poorly on an assignment then they will learn what is necessary to do well on the next test without being punished.It also provides students with the opportunity to practice at what it takes to be successful in school. Doing homework is also a great way to develop responsibilities.By being assigned work one day and knowing that it has to be done by the next day, they will develop a sense of punctuality by turning their work in on time."Monday can be Science, Tuesday -- English, Wednesday -- Math, Thursday -- History and so on," he says.Barbara Hershey, Executive Director, Parents, Teachers and Advocates, Inc., recommends 15-20 minutes of assignments for Kindergarten to 3rd grade, 4 times a week; and 20-45 minutes for grades 4 to 8, 4 times a week, plus test prep. Ricks, a certified Montessori elementary teacher and chef at Our Kitchen argues that homework makes "no contribution to academic achievement for elementary children, and may only moderately impact performance for older students." She believes that the introduction, practice, and review of lesson concepts and objectives can and should be done school during regular elementary school hours.They claim that a student's time can be better spent reading, engaged in a sport/activity, or bonding with family members.Is it possible for kids to still process what they're taught at school and receive a solid, well-rounded education without doing homework?

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